National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment |

National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment

Occasional Paper 25 - Improving teaching, learning, and assessment by making evidence of achievement transparent


 

DQP Cover

Eubanks, D., & Gliem, D. (2015, May). Improving teaching, learning, and assessment by making evidence of achievement transparent. (Occasional Paper No.25). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois and Indiana University, National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA).

Announcement

In NILOA's twenty-fifth occasional paper, authors David Eubanks and David Gliem explore the possibility of authentic achievement of student learning through externally facing assessments.

Paper Abstract

Technology can change higher education by empowering students to make an impact on the world as undergraduates. Done systematically, this would allow institutions to close the credibility gap with an increasingly dubious public. Authentic student achievements that are addressed to a real world audience can lead to richly detailed Resume 2.0 portfolios of work that add value to degrees and the granting institutions. A guide is provided for implementation of new high-impact practices, including structured assignment creation.

Biography of the Authors

David Eubanks serves as Associate Dean of Faculty for Institutional Research and Assessment at Eckerd College. He holds a doctorate in mathematics from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, and has worked in higher education full time since 1991 in teaching and administrative positions. His professional activity includes research and publication on assessment and analytics, and the development of software to facilitate these. He can be reached at deubanks.office@gmail.com.




David Gliem is Associate Professor of Art History, Co-Chair of the Creative Arts Collegium and, since 2012, Chair of the Educational Assessment Committee at Eckerd College. Contact him at gliemde@eckerd.edu.





 

For more information on authentic approaches to assessing student learning please see the previous occasional paper:

Banta, Griffin, Flateby, & Kahn (2009) Three promising alternatives for assessing college students' knowledge and skills.